Sad to hear about the passing of Tilikum, the orca who was subject of Blackfish at 36 years of age. In the wild male orcas can live to 60 - maybe longer. I am glad that Tilly’s suffering is over - but there are dozens more like him, emotionally complex mammals held in captivity around the world. Tilikum spent many of his years in B.C. - and in Canada we still have one orca whale, Kiska, and countless dolphins and belugas in captivity. We are all responsible. It’s time to #emptythetanks. Tilikum is free at last, I hope he finds his tribe again.1) Work station (Kitchen table. I had to move back and forth from front to back of the apartment depending on where the sun was. Animators are a bit like vampires.) #lighttableproblems2) The giant pile. All of my film. (Less the last two scenes which I am still colouring, I’ll post an update when I’m done. Eep.) This has all, thankfully, been photographed.1) Work station (Kitchen table. I had to move back and forth from front to back of the apartment depending on where the sun was. Animators are a bit like vampires.) #lighttableproblems2) The giant pile. All of my film. (Less the last two scenes which I am still colouring, I’ll post an update when I’m done. Eep.) This has all, thankfully, been photographed.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.The final look was created by painting with watercolours, watercolour pencil crayon, beeswax crayons, Chinese ink stick & India ink on animation paper. In some parts I switched colours and textures quite a lot. In others I slower down. I always aimed, when painting, to make each individual image as beautiful as possible, and to work as quickly as I could - without sacrificing quality.@lastsummerinthegarden was an amazing and challenging process. In truth the film was long for me to produce given the time frame - and I am still painting the final two scenes. I painted the first 1900 framed without so much as line testing them - knowing the movement I was working off of was visually pleasing, I trusted that the colour would add another interesting dimension.At first I could only complete 20 or so drawings a day, but at the height of my concentration I completed over 200. Most days averaged out somewhere between 80 and 120. When it hurt to draw I used a brush, and when I didn’t have the control to paint, I pulled out the crayons.Stretching is important, and I am deeply indebted to my wonderful acupuncturist friend who fixed me after I damaged my wrist drawing on the tablet. Take breaks, rest, I would remind myself. It’s a marathon. You can’t die during the first sprint.Theses images are just snippets of thousands of pieces that make up my film. Buy I’m happy to share them to start.Definitive proof that cats have a magnetic relationship with paper.(Taken over the course of the past three months of production on my thesis film @lastsummerinthegarden - which I am just now putting the finishing touches on.)Additional texture in the film is very clearly, provided by these cats.The short haired one is Coraline. The fluffy boy is Dylan.Definitive proof that cats have a magnetic relationship with paper.(Taken over the course of the past three months of production on my thesis film @lastsummerinthegarden - which I am just now putting the finishing touches on.)Additional texture in the film is very clearly, provided by these cats.The short haired one is Coraline. The fluffy boy is Dylan.Definitive proof that cats have a magnetic relationship with paper.(Taken over the course of the past three months of production on my thesis film @lastsummerinthegarden - which I am just now putting the finishing touches on.)Additional texture in the film is very clearly, provided by these cats.The short haired one is Coraline. The fluffy boy is Dylan.Definitive proof that cats have a magnetic relationship with paper.(Taken over the course of the past three months of production on my thesis film @lastsummerinthegarden - which I am just now putting the finishing touches on.)Additional texture in the film is very clearly, provided by these cats.The short haired one is Coraline. The fluffy boy is Dylan.Definitive proof that cats have a magnetic relationship with paper.(Taken over the course of the past three months of production on my thesis film @lastsummerinthegarden - which I am just now putting the finishing touches on.)Additional texture in the film is very clearly, provided by these cats.The short haired one is Coraline. The fluffy boy is Dylan.Definitive proof that cats have a magnetic relationship with paper.(Taken over the course of the past three months of production on my thesis film @lastsummerinthegarden - which I am just now putting the finishing touches on.)Additional texture in the film is very clearly, provided by these cats.The short haired one is Coraline. The fluffy boy is Dylan.Definitive proof that cats have a magnetic relationship with paper.(Taken over the course of the past three months of production on my thesis film @lastsummerinthegarden - which I am just now putting the finishing touches on.)Additional texture in the film is very clearly, provided by these cats.The short haired one is Coraline. The fluffy boy is Dylan.